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  • All fields: Hogarth, William, 1697-1764
(54 results)



Display: 20

    • Rake's Progress

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    • In the fifth painting, Tom attempts to salvage his fortune by marrying a rich but aged and ugly old maid at St Marylebone. In the background, Sarah arrives, holding their child while her indignant mother struggles with a guest. It looks as though...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • In the fourth painting, he narrowly escapes arrest for debt by Welsh bailiffs (as signified by the leeks, a Welsh emblem, in their hats) as he travels in a sedan chair to a party at St. James's Palace to celebrate Queen Caroline's birthday on Saint...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • In the first painting, Tom has come into his fortune on the death of his miserly father. While the servants mourn, he is being measured for new clothes. Although he has had a common-law marriage with her, he is now also rejecting the hand of his...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • In the second painting, Tom is at his morning levee in London, attended by musicians and other hangers-on all dressed in expensive costumes. Surrounding Tom from left to right: a music master at a harpsichord, who was supposed to represent George...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • Finally insane and violent, in the eighth painting he ends his days in Bethlehem Hospital (Bedlam), London's celebrated mental asylum. Only Sarah Young is there to comfort him, but Rakewell continues to ignore her. While some of the details in...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • Detail, Ruined by gambling, the last of his money gone, the Rake tears off his wig and kneels in despair ; behind him other gamesters count up their winnings as the dice game goes on. The scenes is White Chocolate House, frequented by most of the...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • The third painting depicts a wild party or orgy underway at a brothel. The whores are stealing the drunken Tom's watch. On the floor is a night watchman's staff and lantern. The scene takes place at the Rose Tavern, a famous brothel in Covent...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • The sixth painting shows Tom pleading for the assistance of the Almighty in a gambling den at Soho's White Club after losing his 'new fortune'. Neither he nor the other obsessive gamblers seem to have noticed a fire breaking out behind them
    • Rake's Progress

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    • All is lost by the seventh painting, and Tom is incarcerated in the notorious Fleet debtor's prison. He ignores the distress of both his angry new (old) wife and faithful Sarah, who cannot help him this time. Both the beer-boy and the jailer demand...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • Detail, a flock of frauds seeking Rakewell's patronage surrounds him in his London house. A dancing master poses, a gardener presents landscape plans and a jockey holds a silver bowl won in a horse race
    • Rake's Progress

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    • Detail, marrying for money, Tom takes a pop-eyed, hunchbacked crone to wife in a quick ceremony conducted by a clergyman as corrupt as the couple
    • Rake's Progress

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    • Detail, the final stage in the Rake's sad descent was the horror of Bedlam, a London insane asylum whose name, a corruption of Bethlehem Hospital, has stayed in the language as a synonym for chaos
    • Laughing Audience, The

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    • Etching ; The Laughing Audience is divided into three sections which depict three classes of people. The fops in the top register are portrayed as both more refined and more distant from the dramatic experience than the working class audience in...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • Detail, imprisoned for debt, Rakewell is dunned by an urchin for money to pay for a mug of beer, while his wife scolds and the jailer insists on his top ; on the table is a manuscript of a play, rejected by a publisher, with which Rakewell hoped to...
    • Laughing Audience, The

    •  
    • Etching ; The Laughing Audience is divided into three sections which depict three classes of people. The fops in the top register are portrayed as both more refined and more distant from the dramatic experience than the working class audience in...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • Detail, a spree in a tavern leaves the Rake in a stupor at 3 o'clock in the morning after a night of drinking and rioting ; two of the women collaborate in stealing his watch ; at his feet lie souvenirs of the evening's mischief, a watchman's staff...
    • Rake's Progress

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    • Detail, arrested for debt, the Rake is stopped by two bailiffs ; only a prompt payment made by his forsaken sweetheart saves him from prison

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